The effect of clinical, demographic and lifestyle factors on executive function in middle aged and older women

Currell, Matthew, Byrne, Gerard J. and Pachana, Nancy A. (2014) The effect of clinical, demographic and lifestyle factors on executive function in middle aged and older women. International Journal of Clinical Neurosciences and Mental Health, 1 1: 9.1-9.9.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ331864_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 609.72KB 43
Author Currell, Matthew
Byrne, Gerard J.
Pachana, Nancy A.
Title The effect of clinical, demographic and lifestyle factors on executive function in middle aged and older women
Journal name International Journal of Clinical Neurosciences and Mental Health
ISSN 2182-570X
Publication date 2014-06-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 1
Issue 1
Start page 9.1
End page 9.9
Total pages 9
Place of publication Arouca, Aveiro, Portugal
Publisher ARC Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: Global population ageing has contributed to an increased prevalence of cognitive dysfunction. The current study investigated the psychological, health, lifestyle and demographic factors later in life that are associated with executive function.

Methods: AThe data for this project were collected as part of the Longitudinal Assessment of Women (LAW) study. A neuropsychological test battery was administered to 376 women and this was augmented by self-report data from a postal questionnaire covering psychological, lifestyle and sociodemographic factors.

Results: Investigation of variables influencing a composite measure of executive functioning demonstrated that increasing age and higher self-reported depression had a negative relationship with executive abilities while higher levels of education, mild alcohol consumption and higher BMI had a positive relationship with executive functioning.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that treating depression, and encouraging a healthy diet, which may include mild alcohol consumption, may positively affect executive performance in older adults.
Keyword Executive functioning
Depression
Anxiety
Diabetes
Obesity
Alcohol
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
Official Audit
School of Medicine Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 05 Jun 2014, 09:51:36 EST by Sheila Cleary on behalf of School of Psychology