Dysphagia management via telerehabilitation: a review of the current evidence

Ward, Elizabeth C. and Burns, Clare L. (2014) Dysphagia management via telerehabilitation: a review of the current evidence. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Research, 3 5: 1088-1094. doi:10.6051/j.issn.2224-3992.2014.03.408-17

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Ward, Elizabeth C.
Burns, Clare L.
Title Dysphagia management via telerehabilitation: a review of the current evidence
Journal name Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2224-3992
2224-6509
Publication date 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.6051/j.issn.2224-3992.2014.03.408-17
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 3
Issue 5
Start page 1088
End page 1094
Total pages 7
Place of publication Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Publisher A C T Publishing Group
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Dysphagia is a common symptom of a wide range of medical conditions. Accurate assessment, diagnosis and management of dysphagia requires the expertise of a skilled speech pathologist with access to a range of clinical resources. Unfortunately, not all services are easily accessible by patients, and many services face challenges of insufficient staffing, limited access to necessary equipment for instrumental assessments and/or a lack of clinicians with specialist expertise in dysphagia assessment and management to meet current service demands. Telerehabilitation is a model of care, which has the potential to address some of these barriers to improve patient access to dysphagia services. This paper details the evidence base for dysphagia assessment and management conducted via telerehabilitation available to date. It discusses the issues involved with evaluating telerehabilitation services and highlights important considerations for future service development. Overall the evidence base in this field is in its infancy and there are multiple questions which require further research. Despite this, the current evidence is largely positive, supporting the potential for telerehabilitation to serve as a viable clinical modality for the delivery of dysphagia management in the future.
Keyword Dysphagia
Deglutition and deglutition disorders
Telerehabilitation
Telehealth
Swallowing disorders
Clinical swallowing examination
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
Official Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 04 Jun 2014, 09:59:29 EST by Professor Elizabeth Ward on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences