Can human mannequin-based simulation provide a feasible and clinically acceptable method for training tracheostomy management skills for speech pathologists?

Ward, Elizabeth C., Baker, Sonia C., Wall, Laurelie R., Duggan, Brooke L. J., Hancock, Kelli L., Bassett, Lynell V. and Hyde, Trent J. (2014) Can human mannequin-based simulation provide a feasible and clinically acceptable method for training tracheostomy management skills for speech pathologists?. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 1-16. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0050

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Author Ward, Elizabeth C.
Baker, Sonia C.
Wall, Laurelie R.
Duggan, Brooke L. J.
Hancock, Kelli L.
Bassett, Lynell V.
Hyde, Trent J.
Title Can human mannequin-based simulation provide a feasible and clinically acceptable method for training tracheostomy management skills for speech pathologists?
Journal name American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1058-0360
1558-9110
Publication date 2014-06-25
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0050
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Place of publication Rockville, MD, United States
Publisher American Speech - Language - Hearing Association
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: Workplace training for tracheostomy management is currently recognized to be inconsistent and insufficient. A novel approach, using technology-enhanced simulation, may provide a solution to training tracheostomy management skills by providing a consistent, time-efficient, and risk-free learning environment. The current research evaluated clinicians’ tracheostomy skills acquisition after training in a simulated learning environment and explored changes in clinicians’ confidence and perceptions after the experience.
Method: Forty-two clinicians with no or low levels of tracheostomy skill attended one of six, 1-day simulation courses. The training involved both part–task skill learning and immersive simulated scenarios. To evaluate clinicians’ acquisition of manual skills, performance of core tasks during the scenarios was assessed by independent observers. Questionnaires were used to examine perceived outcomes, benefits, and perceptions of the learning environment at pre-, post-, and 4 months post-training.
Results: Only 1 clinician failed to successfully execute all core practical tasks. Clinicians’ confidence increased significantly (p < .05) from pre- to post-workshop and was maintained to 4 months post-workshop across most parameters. All clinicians reported positive perceptions regarding their learning outcomes and learning in a simulated environment.
Conclusion: These findings validate the use of simulation as a clinical training medium and support its future use in tracheostomy competency-training pathways.
Keyword Simulation
Tracheostomy training
Speech-language pathology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 04 Jun 2014, 09:52:41 EST by Professor Elizabeth Ward on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences