Cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts in melanoma and the tumor microenvironment

Kuphal, Silke and Haass, Nikolas K. (2011). Cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts in melanoma and the tumor microenvironment. In Anja Bosserhoff (Ed.), Melanoma Development: Molecular Biology, Genetics and Clinical Application (pp. 181-215) Vienna, Austria: SpringerWienNewYork. doi:10.1007/978-3-7091-0371-5


Author Kuphal, Silke
Haass, Nikolas K.
Title of chapter Cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts in melanoma and the tumor microenvironment
Title of book Melanoma Development: Molecular Biology, Genetics and Clinical Application
Place of Publication Vienna, Austria
Publisher SpringerWienNewYork
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1007/978-3-7091-0371-5
Open Access Status
ISBN 9783709103708
9783709103715
Editor Anja Bosserhoff
Chapter number 9
Start page 181
End page 215
Total pages 35
Total chapters 17
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Cell-contacts are essential for intercellular communication and are involved in proliferation, differentiation, and homeostasis. Melanocytes establish multiple contacts with keratinocytes, which in turn control melanocyte growth and expression of cell surface receptors. Most melanomas arise within the epidermis (melanoma in situ) and then invade across the basement membrane. These melanoma cells escape from control by keratinocytes through five major mechanisms: (1) down-regulation of receptors important for communication with keratinocytes such as E-cadherin, P-cadherin, desmoglein, and connexins; (2) up-regulation of receptors and signaling molecules important for interactions between melanoma cells and other melanoma cells, fibroblasts, or endothelial cells, such as N-cadherin, Mel-CAM, and zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1); (3) de-regulation of morphogens such as Notch receptors and their ligands; (4) loss of anchorage to the basement membrane due to altered expression of cell–matrix adhesion molecules; (5) increased expression of metalloproteinases.

Melanoma depends on, interacts with and reacts to its stroma, including extracellular matrix, growth factors, cytokines, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells. In turn, melanoma is known to produce factors that influence its environment, and may force it to alter cell–cell communication.

In the current review we describe the alterations in cell–cell contacts in melanoma and the tumor microenvironment associated with melanoma development and progression.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: UQ Diamantina Institute Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 02 Jun 2014, 00:33:52 EST by Nikolas Haass on behalf of UQ Diamantina Institute