Karl Popper and Thailand's political crisis: the monarchy as the problem for an 'open society'

Jory, Patrick (2014). Karl Popper and Thailand's political crisis: the monarchy as the problem for an 'open society'. In Gregory C. G. Moore (Ed.), The Open Society and its Enemies in East Asia: The Relevance of the Popperian Framework (pp. 49-66) Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Jory, Patrick
Title of chapter Karl Popper and Thailand's political crisis: the monarchy as the problem for an 'open society'
Title of book The Open Society and its Enemies in East Asia: The Relevance of the Popperian Framework
Place of Publication Abingdon, Oxon, UK
Publisher Routledge
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
Open Access Status
Series Routledge Studies in the Modern World Economy
ISBN 9780415739238
9781315816784
9781306661935
9781317811671
Editor Gregory C. G. Moore
Volume number 130
Chapter number 2
Start page 49
End page 66
Total pages 18
Total chapters 8
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The problem this chapter seeks to address is the return to a 'closed', illiberal society in Thailand since the coup of 19 September 2006. This sudden change took place after fourteen years of apparent political liberalization since the prodemocracy protests of May 1992, and a much longer period of economic expansion...

This chapter will attempt to explain the reasons for this apparent democratic reversal. Its argument is straightforward. For many years there has been a lingering misunderstanding about the problem of political liberalization in Thailand. The misunderstanding derives primarily from a misreading of the country's history which lays the blame for Thailand's authoritarian politics primarily on the military. Thailand has often been conveniently grouped along with other modernizing states in East Asia where the military has dominated politics for much of the post-independence era, such as South Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar. Such comparisons, often favoured by political science theorists, obscure the particular character of the political system in Thailand.

In fact, the military in Thailand is one element of a bigger problem; that is, the political status of the Thai monarchy since the overthrow of the Absolute Monarchy in 1932. The argument this chapter seeks to present is that it is the monarchy that poses the major obstacle to an open society in Thailand today. Unless the problem of the monarchy is dealt with, Thailand cannot develop into the kind of open society that Popper described. I will explain the reasons for this misunderstanding of Thailand's political predicament, and how the monarchy and the political order it legitimizes presents such a problem for an open society.
Keyword Popper
Thailand
Monarchy
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 30 May 2014, 14:24:19 EST by Dr Patrick Jory on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry