Effectiveness of Preservice Music Teacher Education Programs: Perceptions of Early-Career Music Teachers

Ballantyne, Julie (2005). Effectiveness of Preservice Music Teacher Education Programs: Perceptions of Early-Career Music Teachers PhD Thesis, Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland University of Technology.

Author Ballantyne, Julie
Thesis Title Effectiveness of Preservice Music Teacher Education Programs: Perceptions of Early-Career Music Teachers
School, Centre or Institute Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology
Institution Queensland University of Technology
Publication date 2005-09-15
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Macpherson, Ian
Packer, Jan
Language eng
Subjects 1904 Performing Arts and Creative Writing
1303 Specialist Studies in Education
Abstract/Summary The quality of teaching occurring in schools is directly linked to the quality of preservice preparation that teachers receive (Darling-Hammond, 2000). This is particularly important in the area of music teacher education, given the unique challenges that classroom music teachers commonly face (Ballantyne, 2001). This thesis explores early-career music teachers' perceptions of the effectiveness of their preservice teacher education programs in Queensland. It also explores influences impacting upon early-career music teachers' perceptions of effectiveness and early-career music teachers' perceived needs in relation to their preservice preparation. The study addresses the research questions through the use of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. In Stage 1 of the research, questionnaires were completed by 76 secondary classroom music teachers in their first four years of teaching in Queensland, Australia. In Stage 2 of the research, 15 of these teachers were interviewed to explore findings from the questionnaire in depth. Findings suggest that preservice teachers perceive a need for teacher education courses to be contextualised, integrated and allow for the continual development of knowledge and skills throughout their early years in schools. This research provides an empirical basis for reconceptualising music teacher education courses and raises important issues that music teacher educators need to address in order to ensure that graduates are adequately prepared for classroom music teaching.
Additional Notes http://eprints.qut.edu.au/16074/

Document type: Thesis
Collection: Non-UQ Theses
 
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Created: Tue, 27 May 2014, 10:45:20 EST by Dr Julie Ballantyne on behalf of School of Music