Policy networks, stakeholder interactions and climate adaptation in the region of South East Queensland, Australia

McAllister, Ryan R.J., McCrea, Rod and Lubell, Mark N. (2014) Policy networks, stakeholder interactions and climate adaptation in the region of South East Queensland, Australia. Regional Environmental Change, 14 2: 527-539. doi:10.1007/s10113-013-0489-4


Author McAllister, Ryan R.J.
McCrea, Rod
Lubell, Mark N.
Title Policy networks, stakeholder interactions and climate adaptation in the region of South East Queensland, Australia
Journal name Regional Environmental Change   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1436-378X
1436-3798
Publication date 2014-04
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10113-013-0489-4
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 14
Issue 2
Start page 527
End page 539
Total pages 13
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Subject 2306 Global and Planetary Change
Abstract The strategic use of science in regional policy-making forums often assumes collaborative interactions between stakeholders. However, other types of stakeholder interactions are possible. This paper uses the ecology of games to frame an investigation into stakeholder participation in the policy networks for regional climate change planning for South East Queensland, Australia. We tracked organisational participation in policy forums between 2008 and 2012. We then used a novel bipartite network theoretical approach to identify participation by different types of organisations across shared multiple forums, which we argue prefaces: cooperation, collaboration, support or advocacy. Network analysis was then combined with semi-structured interviews to access how scientific information was utilised across the regional network. Our results suggest that stakeholder interactions were predominately used to advocate for organisational agendas. Advocacy artificially narrows the scope of possible policy options and represents a biased, selective use of information. While advocacy is an important part of policy process, as a counter balance, explicit efforts are needed to recurrently expand the scope of policy options.
Keyword Exponential random graph model
Governance
Political science
Science and technology policy
Science technology and society
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Non HERDC
 
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