Systematic literature review: association between soil and clinical expression of Johne's disease

Cowled, Brendan and Burns, Richard (2012) Systematic literature review: association between soil and clinical expression of Johne's disease North Sydney, NSW, Australia: Meat & Livestock Australia

Author Cowled, Brendan
Burns, Richard
Title of report Systematic literature review: association between soil and clinical expression of Johne's disease
Publication date 2012-12
ISBN 9781741919615
Publisher Meat & Livestock Australia
Place of publication North Sydney, NSW, Australia
Total pages 49
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Prima facie there is little doubt that soil plays an important role in the epidemiology of Johne’s Disease (JD) , given its role in JD transmission . However, the aim of this review was to assess whether there was an association between soil type (in particular soil pH) and the occurrence of JD in sheep or cattle. A comprehensive and systematic literature review of the role of soil type in clinical expression of JD was conducted. Over nearly a century, a large amount of literature exploring the association between JD/Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (Mptb) and soil has been published. However objective evidence to assess the association between soil and JD is limited.

Various features of soil affect the survival, retention and movement of Mptb in soil. These many influential soil features interact in complex ways and vary markedly across the national and international range of JD. This indicates that it may be very difficult to generalise the role of soil in JD epidemiology . Not surprisingly therefore, associations identified were not consistent and were often contradictory, with some papers reporting an association between soil features and JD/infection with Mptb and others finding no association.

Several hypotheses were mentioned in the literature that sought to explain observed or perceived associations. Some have little support whilst others may be plausible but are supported by just one observational study.

Further study is required to assess the role of soil type in clinical expression of JD, since the evidence at this stage is inconclusive. However, the need for further study must be balanced against the practicality of applying any future research results.
Q-Index Code AX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Report to the Meat and Livestock Australia.

Document type: Research Report
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Wed, 21 May 2014, 15:22:02 EST by Emma Lambe on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences