Client/clinician discrepancies in perceived problem improvement and the potential influence on dropout response

Pulford, Justin, Adams, Peter and Sheridan, Janie (2009) Client/clinician discrepancies in perceived problem improvement and the potential influence on dropout response. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 7 4: 497-505. doi:10.1007/s11469-007-9116-2


Author Pulford, Justin
Adams, Peter
Sheridan, Janie
Title Client/clinician discrepancies in perceived problem improvement and the potential influence on dropout response
Journal name International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1557-1874
1557-1882
Publication date 2009-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11469-007-9116-2
Open Access Status
Volume 7
Issue 4
Start page 497
End page 505
Total pages 9
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract his paper examines the possibility that clinicians working in an alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment service may lack appreciation of problem improvement in clients who choose to dropout against clinical advice. Underlying this investigation is the belief that if clinicians are indeed unperceptive of problem improvement amongst this population then this may explain why retention based responses to client dropout continue to be promoted, despite evidence to suggest that they are ineffective and/or unnecessary. Outcome data obtained from a sample of 75 AOD treatment clients and their respective clinicians at baseline and 2-month follow-up are reported. Analysis of these data suggest a client/clinician discrepancy in perceived problem improvement was evident in the study setting: clinicians reported significantly less problem improvement in the first 2 months of service attendance as compared to their clients and this discrepancy was most pronounced if the client had dropped out of treatment.
Keyword Dropout
Retention
Treatment fit
Treatment outcome
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 21 May 2014, 08:21:20 EST by Justin Pulford on behalf of School of Public Health