An investigation into whether clients and/or their respective clinicians are aware of pending service exit in the first two months of treatment admission

Pulford, Justin, Adams, Peter and Sheridan, Janie (2009) An investigation into whether clients and/or their respective clinicians are aware of pending service exit in the first two months of treatment admission. Drug and Alcohol Review, 28 6: 631-635. doi:10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00066.x


Author Pulford, Justin
Adams, Peter
Sheridan, Janie
Title An investigation into whether clients and/or their respective clinicians are aware of pending service exit in the first two months of treatment admission
Journal name Drug and Alcohol Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1465-3362
0959-5236
Publication date 2009-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00066.x
Volume 28
Issue 6
Start page 631
End page 635
Total pages 5
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction and Aims. When a client exits an alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment service against clinical advice, they and their service may incur significant disadvantage. The extent of awareness by both clients and clinicians that treatment would not continue has not been examined. Accordingly, this paper presents findings from a study that sought to identify whether clients and/or their respective clinicians were aware of pending service exit that occurred within the first 2 months of treatment admission.

Design and Methods. The study was set in an outpatient AOD treatment service located in Auckland, New Zealand. Data were obtained by structured questionnaire and were reported for a group of clients (n = 49), clinicians (n = 46) and matched client/clinician pairs (n = 36).

Results. Overall, clients and clinicians were no more likely to accurately identify pending service exit at a rate greater than would be expected by chance alone. However, clinicians were significantly more likely to identify pending service exit as compared with their respective clients (47% vs. 25%), although a large proportion of both groups expected treatment to continue beyond what proved to be the final treatment appointment (44% and 52%, respectively).

Discussion and Conclusions. These findings suggest that service exit that occurs within the first 2 months of treatment admission may be largely unpredictable and that, as a result of this unpredictability, the opportunities for a targeted response may be limited.
Keyword Addiction
Dropout
Retention
Termination
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 21 May 2014, 18:19:28 EST by Justin Pulford on behalf of School of Public Health