Recruiting gamblers from the general population for research purposes: outcomes from two contrasting approaches

Williams, Jeremy D., Pulford, Justin, Bellringer, Maria and Abbott, Max (2010) Recruiting gamblers from the general population for research purposes: outcomes from two contrasting approaches. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 8 1: 1-7. doi:10.1007/s11469-009-9194-4


Author Williams, Jeremy D.
Pulford, Justin
Bellringer, Maria
Abbott, Max
Title Recruiting gamblers from the general population for research purposes: outcomes from two contrasting approaches
Journal name International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1557-1874
1557-1882
Publication date 2010-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11469-009-9194-4
Open Access Status
Volume 8
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract Multiple means exist by which gamblers including problem gamblers may be recruited from the general population for research survey purposes. However, there appears to be limited discussion in the published literature about the relative merits of one or other approach. This paper addresses this gap, in part, by reporting the experiences of employing two contrasting approaches to survey recruitment: passive advertisement versus active solicitation outside gambling venues. Fifty participants were recruited by advertisement and 54 by active solicitation. The former group was found to be less ethnically diverse and more likely to be problem gamblers than the latter group which, due to the nature of the recruitment process, showed a more even distribution of ethnicity and PGSI classified risk and problem gambler categories. Results also indicated that recruitment by advertisement was more cost effective for reaching problem gamblers whilst active solicitation was more cost effective for the recruitment of low risk and moderate risk gamblers.
Keyword Problem gambling
Recruitment
Help-seeking
New Zealand
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 21 May 2014, 08:08:18 EST by Justin Pulford on behalf of School of Public Health