Natural history of atypical and equivocal melanocytic lesions in children: An observational study of 19 cases

Pizzichetta, Maria A., Talamini, Renato, Stanganelli, Ignazio and Soyer, Hans Peter (2014) Natural history of atypical and equivocal melanocytic lesions in children: An observational study of 19 cases. Pediatric Dermatology, 31 3: 331-336. doi:10.1111/pde.12259


Author Pizzichetta, Maria A.
Talamini, Renato
Stanganelli, Ignazio
Soyer, Hans Peter
Title Natural history of atypical and equivocal melanocytic lesions in children: An observational study of 19 cases
Journal name Pediatric Dermatology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1525-1470
0736-8046
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/pde.12259
Open Access Status
Volume 31
Issue 3
Start page 331
End page 336
Total pages 6
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc.
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Subject 2708 Dermatology
2735 Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
Abstract Digital dermoscopy follow-up helps to identify patterns of change typical of common atypical nevi and early melanoma and improves the follow-up of patients with atypical nevi. We report the morphologic changes observed over time in 19 atypical or equivocal acquired melanocytic nevi that underwent dermoscopic follow-up. Two observers retrospectively examined digitalized dermoscopic images of 19 atypical melanocytic nevi from 15 children and young adults (median age 12 years, range 3-26 years). The images were assessed for global dermoscopic patterns at baseline and after a median 25-month (range 6-138 mos) follow-up. Ten (52.6%) nevi changed and nine (47.4%) retained a stable dermoscopic pattern. Of the 10 changing lesions, 2 of 4 homogeneous nevi evolved into a reticular pattern and 2 into a mixed pattern; 1 of 2 nevi with a mixed pattern evolved into a homogeneous nevus and 1 into a regressing nevus; 1 of 2 nevi with "other" patterns, such as negative pigment network and peppering throughout the lesion, evolved into a mixed nevus and 1 into a regressing nevus; 1 globular nevus evolved into a mixed pattern; and 1 starburst nevus evolved into a homogeneous nevus. The most striking results of our study were that atypical nevi can evolve into common nevi or they can regress, as documented by long-term dermoscopic follow-up. In children and young adults, dermoscopic follow-up of atypical nevi might be a valid alternative to surgical excision and enables us to achieve new insights into the natural history of these nevi.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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