Lactic acid bacteria convert glucosinolates to nitriles efficiently yet differently from enterobacteriaceae

Mullaney, Jane A., Kelly, William J., McGhie, Tony K., Ansell, Juliet and Heyes, Julian A. (2013) Lactic acid bacteria convert glucosinolates to nitriles efficiently yet differently from enterobacteriaceae. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 61 12: 3039-3046. doi:10.1021/jf305442j


Author Mullaney, Jane A.
Kelly, William J.
McGhie, Tony K.
Ansell, Juliet
Heyes, Julian A.
Title Lactic acid bacteria convert glucosinolates to nitriles efficiently yet differently from enterobacteriaceae
Journal name Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-8561
1520-5118
Publication date 2013-03-27
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1021/jf305442j
Open Access Status
Volume 61
Issue 12
Start page 3039
End page 3046
Total pages 8
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Chemical Society
Collection year 2014
Formatted abstract
Glucosinolates from the genus Brassica can be converted into bioactive compounds known to induce phase II enzymes, which may decrease the risk of cancers. Conversion via hydrolysis is usually by the brassica enzyme myrosinase, which can be inactivated by cooking or storage. We examined the potential of three beneficial bacteria, Lactobacillus plantarum KW30, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis KF147, and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, and known myrosinase-producer Enterobacter cloacae to catalyze the conversion of glucosinolates in broccoli extract. Enterobacteriaceae consumed on average 65% glucoiberin and 78% glucoraphanin, transforming them into glucoiberverin and glucoerucin, respectively, and small amounts of iberverin nitrile and erucin nitrile. The lactic acid bacteria did not accumulate reduced glucosinolates, consuming all at 30-33% and transforming these into iberverin nitrile, erucin nitrile, sulforaphane nitrile, and further unidentified metabolites. Adding beneficial bacteria to a glucosinolate-rich diet may increase glucosinolate transformation, thereby increasing host exposure to bioactives.
Keyword Bacterial myrosinase
Broccoli
Glucosinolates
Gut bacteria
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
UQ Diamantina Institute Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 17 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 19 May 2014, 11:21:57 EST by Jane Mullaney on behalf of UQ Diamantina Institute