Alcohol and cardiovascular health: the dose makes the poison...or the remedy

O'Keefe, James H., Bhatti, Salman K., Bajwa, Ata, DiNicolantonio, James J. and Lavie, Carl J. (2014) Alcohol and cardiovascular health: the dose makes the poison...or the remedy. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 89 3: 382-393. doi:10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.11.005

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Author O'Keefe, James H.
Bhatti, Salman K.
Bajwa, Ata
DiNicolantonio, James J.
Lavie, Carl J.
Title Alcohol and cardiovascular health: the dose makes the poison...or the remedy
Journal name Mayo Clinic Proceedings   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-6196
1942-5546
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.11.005
Open Access Status
Volume 89
Issue 3
Start page 382
End page 393
Total pages 12
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Subject 2700 Medicine
Formatted abstract
Habitual light to moderate alcohol intake (up to 1 drink per day for women and 1 or 2 drinks per day for men) is associated with decreased risks for total mortality, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, and stroke. However, higher levels of alcohol consumption are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Indeed, behind only smoking and obesity, excessive alcohol consumption is the third leading cause of premature death in the United States. Heavy alcohol use (1) is one of the most common causes of reversible hypertension, (2) accounts for about one-third of all cases of nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, (3) is a frequent cause of atrial fibrillation, and (4) markedly increases risks of strokedboth ischemic and hemorrhagic. The risk-to-benefit ratio of drinking appears higher in younger individuals, who also have higher rates of excessive or binge drinking and more frequently have adverse consequences of acute intoxication (for example, accidents, violence, and social strife). In fact, among males aged 15 to 59 years, alcohol abuse is the leading risk factor for premature death. Of the various drinking patterns, daily low- to moderate-dose alcohol intake, ideally red wine before or during the evening meal, is associated with the strongest reduction in adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Health care professionals should not recommend alcohol to nondrinkers because of the paucity of randomized outcome data and the potential for problem drinking even among individuals at apparently low risk. The findings in this review were based on a literature search of PubMed for the 15-year period 1997 through 2012 using the search terms alcohol, ethanol, cardiovascular disease, coronary artery disease, heart failure, hypertension, stroke, and mortality. Studies were considered if they were deemed to be of high quality, objective, and methodologically sound.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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