Genetic influences are virtually absent for trust

Van Lange, Paul A. M., Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E. and Posthuma, Danielle (2014) Genetic influences are virtually absent for trust. PLoS One, 9 4: e93880.1-e93880.8. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0093880


Author Van Lange, Paul A. M.
Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.
Posthuma, Danielle
Title Genetic influences are virtually absent for trust
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2014-04-07
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0093880
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 9
Issue 4
Start page e93880.1
End page e93880.8
Total pages 8
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Subject 1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
1300 Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
2700 Medicine
Abstract Over the past decades, numerous twin studies have revealed moderate to high heritability estimates for individual differences in a wide range of human traits, including cognitive ability, psychiatric disorders, and personality traits. Even factors that are generally believed to be environmental in nature have been shown to be under genetic control, albeit modest. Is such heritability also present in social traits that are conceptualized as causes and consequences of social interactions or in other ways strongly shaped by behavior of other people? Here we examine a population-based sample of 1,012 twins and relatives. We show that the genetic influence on generalized trust in other people (trust-in-others: h2 = 5%, ns), and beliefs regarding other people's trust in the self (trust-in-self: h2 = 13%, ns), is virtually absent. As test-retest reliability for both scales were found to be moderate or high (r = .76 and r = .53, respectively) in an independent sample, we conclude that all variance in trust is likely to be accounted for by non-shared environmental influences. We show that, relative to cognitive abilities, psychiatric disorders, and classic personality variables, genetic influences are smaller for trust, and propose that experiences with or observations of the behavior of other people shape trust more strongly than other traits.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 18 May 2014, 00:20:37 EST by System User on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute