Emerging Adults' Work and Family Aspirations: Investigating relationships with Gender role attitudes, Socio-economic Status and Maternal Working Patterns

Aspinall, Leah (2013). Emerging Adults' Work and Family Aspirations: Investigating relationships with Gender role attitudes, Socio-economic Status and Maternal Working Patterns Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Aspinall, Leah
Thesis Title Emerging Adults' Work and Family Aspirations: Investigating relationships with Gender role attitudes, Socio-economic Status and Maternal Working Patterns
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Melissa Johnstone
Total pages 106
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Within Australia, men and women entering the workforce and starting a family are required to negotiate their roles to facilitate a work-family balance (Craig & Sawrikar, 2009). Although men and women are more satisfied being part of both work and family domains (Craig & Sawrikar, 2009), the Australian work climate continues to be highly gendered, with women more likely to be responsible for childcare tasks, and men working more hours in the paid workforce (ABS, 2006; Craig & Powell, 2011). As emerging adults have yet to enter either of these domains, exploring their work and family aspirations can help to understand their negotiation of work and family roles and psychological development as they transition into adulthood. This thesis aimed to investigate the extent gender role attitudes, maternal working patterns and SES predicted emerging adult men and women's aspirations for work and family. A total of 331 participants (101 male, 230 female) aged 18-29 years took part in an online survey investigating the psychosocial predictors of emerging adults' work and family aspirations. Seven hypotheses were tested. Men and women were predicted to vary on their ratings of the importance and confidence of achieving parenthood and career aspirations according to their gender role attitudes, SES, and for women, their mother's working patterns when they were young. In addition, it was predicted that perceived work-family conflict would mediate the relationship between gender role attitudes and confidence in achieving aspirations for men, whilst for women it was predicted that gender role attitudes and their expected work-family conflict would mediate the relationship between maternal working patterns and confidence in achieving aspirations. In general, women's career and parenthood aspirations were more likely to be predicted by their perceptions of work-family conflict. Men's aspirations for career and parenthood were strongly related to their gender role attitudes. Findings were also discussed in regards to strengths and limitations, implications and future research.
Keyword Work and family
Gender role attitudes
Maternal working pattern
balance

 
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Created: Wed, 07 May 2014, 10:38:39 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology