Autonomy and coercion in academic “cognitive enhancement” using methylphenidate: perspectives of key stakeholders

Forlini, Cynthia and Racine, Eric (2009) Autonomy and coercion in academic “cognitive enhancement” using methylphenidate: perspectives of key stakeholders. Neuroethics, 2 3: 163-177. doi:10.1007/s12152-009-9043-y

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Author Forlini, Cynthia
Racine, Eric
Title Autonomy and coercion in academic “cognitive enhancement” using methylphenidate: perspectives of key stakeholders
Journal name Neuroethics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1874-5490
1874-5504
Publication date 2009-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12152-009-9043-y
Open Access Status
Volume 2
Issue 3
Start page 163
End page 177
Total pages 15
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract There is mounting evidence that methylphenidate (MPH; Ritalin) is being used by healthy college students to improve concentration, alertness, and academic performance. One of the key concerns associated with such use of pharmaceuticals is the degree of freedom individuals have to engage in or abstain from cognitive enhancement (CE). From a pragmatic perspective, careful examination of the ethics of acts and contexts in which they arise includes considering coercion and social pressures to enhance cognition. We were interested in understanding how university students, parents of university students, and healthcare providers viewed autonomy and coercion in CE using MPH. We found that perspectives converged on the belief that CE is a matter of personal and individual choice. Perspectives also converged on the existence of tremendous social pressures to perform and succeed. Parents emphasized personal responsibility and accountability for CE choices, and expressed feelings of worry, sadness and fear about CE. Students emphasized the importance of personal integrity in CE, expressed tolerance for personal choices of others, and highlighted the challenge that CE poses to maintaining one’s personal integrity. Healthcare providers emphasized the health consequences of CE. These results illustrate: (1) the importance of understanding how context is viewed in relation to perspectives on autonomous choice; (2) the limitations of individualistic libertarian approaches that do not consider social context; and (3) the ethical implications of public health interventions in a value-laden debate where perspectives diverge.
Keyword Cognitive enhancement
Autonomy
Neuroethics
Public understanding
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 31 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 49 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 06 May 2014, 14:27:44 EST by Cynthia Forlini on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research