Visual motion modulates pattern sensitivity ahead, behind, and beside motion

Arnold, Derek H., Marinovic, Welber and Whitney, David (2014) Visual motion modulates pattern sensitivity ahead, behind, and beside motion. Vision Research, 98 99-106. doi:10.1016/j.visres.2014.03.003

Author Arnold, Derek H.
Marinovic, Welber
Whitney, David
Title Visual motion modulates pattern sensitivity ahead, behind, and beside motion
Journal name Vision Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1878-5646
Publication date 2014-05
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.visres.2014.03.003
Open Access Status
Volume 98
Start page 99
End page 106
Total pages 8
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Retinal motion can modulate visual sensitivity. For instance, low contrast drifting waveforms (targets) can be easier to detect when abutting the leading edges of movement in adjacent high contrast waveforms (inducers), rather than the trailing edges. This target-inducer interaction is contingent on the adjacent waveforms being consistent with one another – in-phase as opposed to out-of-phase. It has been suggested that this happens because there is a perceptually explicit predictive signal at leading edges of motion that summates with low contrast physical input – a ‘predictive summation’. Another possible explanation is a phase sensitive ‘spatial summation’, a summation of physical inputs spread across the retina (not predictive signals). This should be non-selective in terms of position – it should be evident at leading, adjacent, and at trailing edges of motion. To tease these possibilities apart, we examined target sensitivity at leading, adjacent, and trailing edges of motion. We also examined target sensitivity adjacent to flicker, and for a stimulus that is less susceptible to spatial summation, as it sums to grey across a small retinal expanse. We found evidence for spatial summation in all but the last condition. Finally, we examined sensitivity to an absence of signal at leading and trailing edges of motion, finding greater sensitivity at leading edges. These results are inconsistent with the existence of a perceptually explicit predictive signal in advance of drifting waveforms. Instead, we suggest that phase-contingent target-inducer modulations of sensitivity are explicable in terms of a directionally modulated spatial summation.
Keyword Motion
Spatial coding
Spatial summation
Predictive coding
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 06 May 2014, 02:06:25 EST by System User on behalf of School of Psychology