The molecular size distribution of glycogen and its relevance to diabetes

Gilbert, Robert G. and Sullivan, Mitchell A. (2014). The molecular size distribution of glycogen and its relevance to diabetes. In: Special issue containing papers collected from the 34th Australasian Polymer Symposium (34APS). 34th Australasian Polymer Symposium, Darwin, Australia, (538-543). 7 10 July 2013. doi:10.1071/CH13573


Author Gilbert, Robert G.
Sullivan, Mitchell A.
Title of paper The molecular size distribution of glycogen and its relevance to diabetes
Conference name 34th Australasian Polymer Symposium
Conference location Darwin, Australia
Conference dates 7 10 July 2013
Proceedings title Special issue containing papers collected from the 34th Australasian Polymer Symposium (34APS)   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Australian Journal of Chemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Collingwood, Australia
Publisher CSIRO
Publication Year 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1071/CH13573
Open Access Status
ISSN 0004-9425
1445-0038
Volume 67
Issue 4
Start page 538
End page 543
Total pages 6
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Glycogen is a highly branched polymer of glucose, functioning as a blood-glucose buffer. It comprises relatively small β-particles, which may be joined as larger aggregate α-particles. The size distributions from size-exclusion chromatography (SEC, also known as GPC) of liver glycogen from non-diabetic and diabetic mice show that diabetic mice have impaired α-particle formation, shedding new light on diabetes. SEC data also suggest the type of bonding holding β-particles together in α-particles. SEC characterisation of liver glycogen at various time points in a day/night cycle indicates that liver glycogen is initially synthesised as β-particles, and then joined by an unknown process to form α-particles. These α-particles are more resistant to degradation, presumably because of their lower surface area-to-volume ratio. These findings have important implications for new drug targets for diabetes management.
Subjects 1600 Chemistry
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 06 May 2014, 01:30:40 EST by System User on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences