The measure and significance of Bateman's principles

Collet, Julie M., Dean, Rebecca F., Worley, Kirsty, Richardson, David S. and Pizzari, Tommaso (2014) The measure and significance of Bateman's principles. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281 1782: . doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.2973

Author Collet, Julie M.
Dean, Rebecca F.
Worley, Kirsty
Richardson, David S.
Pizzari, Tommaso
Title The measure and significance of Bateman's principles
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8452
Publication date 2014-05-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.2973
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 281
Issue 1782
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Collection year 2015
Subject 1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
1300 Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
2300 Environmental Science
2400 Immunology and Microbiology
2700 Medicine
Formatted abstract
Bateman's principles explain sex roles and sexual dimorphism through sex-specific variance in mating success, reproductive success and their relationships within sexes (Bateman gradients). Empirical tests of these principles, however, have come under intense scrutiny. Here, we experimentally show that in replicate groups of red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, mating and reproductive successes were more variable in males than in females, resulting in a steeper male Bateman gradient, consistent with Bateman's principles. However,we use novel quantitative techniques to reveal that current methods typically overestimate Bateman's principles because they (i) infer mating success indirectly from offspring parentage, and thus miss matings that fail to result in fertilization, and (ii) measure Bateman gradients through the univariate regression of reproductive over mating success, without considering the substantial influence of other components of male reproductive success, namely female fecundity and paternity share. We also find a significant female Bateman gradient but show that this likely emerges as spurious consequences of male preference for fecund females, emphasizing the need for experimental approaches to establish the causal relationship between reproductive and mating success. While providing qualitative support for Bateman's principles, our study demonstrates how current approaches can generate a misleading view of sex differences and roles.
Keyword Bateman principles
Sexual selection
Sex roles
Sexual dimorphism
Gallus gallus
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 16 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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