Reflecting optics in the diverticular eye of a deep-sea barreleye fish (Rhynchohyalus natalensis)

Partridge, J. C., Douglas, R. H., Marshall, N. J., Chung, W.-S., Jordan, T. M. and Wagner, H.-J. (2014) Reflecting optics in the diverticular eye of a deep-sea barreleye fish (Rhynchohyalus natalensis). Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281 1782: . doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.3223


Author Partridge, J. C.
Douglas, R. H.
Marshall, N. J.
Chung, W.-S.
Jordan, T. M.
Wagner, H.-J.
Title Reflecting optics in the diverticular eye of a deep-sea barreleye fish (Rhynchohyalus natalensis)
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8452
1471-2954
Publication date 2014-03-19
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.3223
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 281
Issue 1782
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Subject 1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
1300 Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
2300 Environmental Science
2400 Immunology and Microbiology
2700 Medicine
Abstract We describe the bi-directed eyes of a mesopelagic teleost fish, Rhynchohyalus natalensis, that possesses an extensive lateral diverticulum to each tubular eye. Each diverticulum contains a mirror that focuses light from the ventrolateral visual field. This species can thereby visualize both downwelling sunlight and bioluminescence over a wide field of view. Modelling shows that the mirror is very likely to be capable of producing a bright, well focused image. After Dolichopteryx longipes, this is only the second description of an eye in a vertebrate having both reflective and refractive optics. Although superficiallysimilar, the optics of the diverticular eyes of these two species of fish differ in some important respects. Firstly, the reflective crystals in theD. longipes mirror are derived from a tapetum within the retinal pigment epithelium, whereas in R. natalensis they develop from the choroidal argentea. Secondly, in D. longipes the angle of the reflective crystals varies depending on their position within the mirror, forming a Fresnel-type reflector, but in R. natalensis the crystals are orientated almost parallel to themirror's surface and image formation is dependent on the gross morphology of the diverticular mirror. Two remarkably different developmental solutions have thus evolved in these two closely related species of opisthoproctid teleosts to extend the restricted visual field of a tubular eye and provide a well-focused image with reflective optics.
Keyword Deep sea
Mirror optics
Rhynchohyalus natalensis
Vision
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 06 May 2014, 00:35:24 EST by System User on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute