Travel as a risk factor for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the highlands of western Kenya

Shanks, G. D., Biomndo, K., Guyatt, H. L. and Snow, R. W. (2005) Travel as a risk factor for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the highlands of western Kenya. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 99 1: 71-74. doi:10.1016/j.trstmh.2004.04.001


Author Shanks, G. D.
Biomndo, K.
Guyatt, H. L.
Snow, R. W.
Title Travel as a risk factor for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the highlands of western Kenya
Formatted title
Travel as a risk factor for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the highlands of western Kenya
Journal name Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0035-9203
1878-3503
Publication date 2005-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.trstmh.2004.04.001
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 99
Issue 1
Start page 71
End page 74
Total pages 4
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Abstract In the 1980s, highland malaria returned to the tea estates of western Kenya after an absence of nearly a generation. In order to determine the importance of travel for the spread of malaria in this region, we prospectively collected blood films and travel, demographic and geographic information on well persons and outpatients on tea estates near the western rim of the Rift Valley. Risk factors for malaria asexual parasitaemia included: Tribal/ethnic group, home province and home district malaria endemicity. Travel away from the Kericho tea estates within the previous two months showed an odds ratio (OR) for parasitaemia of 1.59 for well persons and 2.38 for outpatients. Sexual stages of malaria parasites (gametocytes) had an OR of 3.14 (well persons) and 2.22 (outpatients) for those who had travelled. Increased risk of malaria parasitaemia with travel was concentrated in children aged <5 years. An increase in population gametocytaemia is possibly due to increased chloroquine resistance and suppressed infections contracted outside of the tea estates.
Keyword Highland malaria
Kenya
Plasmodium falciparum
Travel
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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