Island fever: the historical determinants of malaria in the Andaman Islands

Shanks, G. Dennis and Bradley, David J. (2010) Island fever: the historical determinants of malaria in the Andaman Islands. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 104 3: 185-190. doi:10.1016/j.trstmh.2009.07.012


Author Shanks, G. Dennis
Bradley, David J.
Title Island fever: the historical determinants of malaria in the Andaman Islands
Journal name Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0035-9203
1878-3503
Publication date 2010
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.trstmh.2009.07.012
Open Access Status
Volume 104
Issue 3
Start page 185
End page 190
Total pages 6
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 2405 Parasitology
2725 Infectious Diseases
2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract Malaria was the major cause of morbidity and a leading cause of mortality in the Andaman Islands Penal Colony from 1858 to 1945. Besides annual malaria incidence peaks coinciding with the arrival of the monsoon, multi-year cycles (administrative in nature) of 10-15 years are also discernable. The size of the previous year's prisoner intake was associated (r2 = 0.21, n = 57) with increased malaria. The positive relationship (r2 = 0.33, n = 47) between the total number of Buddhist prisoners and malaria may have been due to prisoners of Burmese ethnicity introducing new malaria strains to the otherwise isolated islands. Well-meaning but ultimately disastrous attempts were made to drain the mangrove swamps around the penal colony. Because of the brackish-water breeding habits of the main vector, Anopheles sundaicus, engineering works along the shoreline often increased malaria. Malaria morbidity approximately trebled from 1928 to 1929 and doubled again in the next year with increases in all-cause mortality from 20/1000 in 1929 to 51/1000 in 1930, coincident with a major dredging operation for a new port. The history of malaria control in the Andaman Islands Penal Colony is a cautionary tale that well-meaning and well-funded efforts can fail spectacularly if local epidemiological reality is not well understood. Crown Copyright
Keyword Andaman Islands
Anopheles sundaicus
Epidemic
Malaria
Morbidity
Mortality
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 05 May 2014, 10:59:17 EST by Ms Kate Rowe on behalf of School of Public Health