The association of early life supplemental nutrition with lean body mass and grip strength in adulthood: evidence from APCAPS

Kulkarni, Bharati, Kuper, Hannah, Radhakrishna, K. V., Hills, Andrew P., Byrne, Nuala M., Taylor, Amy, Sullivan, Ruth, Bowen, Liza, Wells, Jonathan C., Ben-Shlomo, Yoav, Smith, George Davey, Ebrahim, Shah and Kinra, Sanjay (2014) The association of early life supplemental nutrition with lean body mass and grip strength in adulthood: evidence from APCAPS. American Journal of Epidemiology, 179 6: 700-709. doi:10.1093/aje/kwt332


Author Kulkarni, Bharati
Kuper, Hannah
Radhakrishna, K. V.
Hills, Andrew P.
Byrne, Nuala M.
Taylor, Amy
Sullivan, Ruth
Bowen, Liza
Wells, Jonathan C.
Ben-Shlomo, Yoav
Smith, George Davey
Ebrahim, Shah
Kinra, Sanjay
Title The association of early life supplemental nutrition with lean body mass and grip strength in adulthood: evidence from APCAPS
Journal name American Journal of Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9262
1476-6256
Publication date 2014-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwt332
Open Access Status
Volume 179
Issue 6
Start page 700
End page 709
Total pages 10
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract In the present study, we examined the associations of early nutrition with adult lean body mass (LBM) and muscle strength in a birth cohort that was established to assess the long-term impact of a nutrition program. Participants (n = 1,446, 32% female) were born near Hyderabad, India, in 29 villages from 1987 to 1990, during which time only intervention villages (n = 15) had a government program that offered balanced protein-calorie supplementation to pregnant women and children. Participants’ LBM and appendicular skeletal muscle mass were measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry; grip strength and information on lifestyle indicators, including diet and physical activity level, were also obtained. Ages (mean = 20.3 years) and body mass indexes (weight (kg)/height (m)2; mean = 19.5) of participants in 2 groups were similar. Current dietary energy intake was higher in the intervention group. Unadjusted LBM and grip strength were similar in 2 groups. After adjustment for potential confounders, the intervention group had lower LBM (β = −0.75; P = 0.03), appendicular skeletal muscle mass, and grip strength than did controls, but these differences were small in magnitude (<0.1 standard deviation). Multivariable regression analyses showed that current socioeconomic position, energy intake, and physical activity level had a positive association with adult LBM and muscle strength. This study could not detect a “programming” effect of early nutrition supplementation on adult LBM and muscle strength.
Keyword Body composition
Cohort study
Developmental origins of health and disease
Grip strength
Lean body mass
Muscle mass
Nutrition
Physical activity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ)
Official 2015 Collection
 
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