Degradability of creatinine under sewer conditions affects its potential to be used as biomarker in sewage epidemiology

Thai, Phong K., O'Brien, Jake, Jiang, Guangming, Gernjak, Wolfgang, Yuan, Zhiguo, Eaglesham, Geoff and Mueller, Jochen F. (2014) Degradability of creatinine under sewer conditions affects its potential to be used as biomarker in sewage epidemiology. Water Research, 55 272-279. doi:10.1016/j.watres.2014.02.035


Author Thai, Phong K.
O'Brien, Jake
Jiang, Guangming
Gernjak, Wolfgang
Yuan, Zhiguo
Eaglesham, Geoff
Mueller, Jochen F.
Title Degradability of creatinine under sewer conditions affects its potential to be used as biomarker in sewage epidemiology
Journal name Water Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-1354
1879-2448
Publication date 2014-05-15
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2014.02.035
Open Access Status
Volume 55
Start page 272
End page 279
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher I W A Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Creatinine was proposed to be used as a population normalising factor in sewage epidemiology but its stability in the sewer system has not been assessed. This study thus aimed to evaluate the fate of creatinine under different sewer conditions using laboratory sewer reactors. The results showed that while creatinine was stable in wastewater only, it degraded quickly in reactors with the presence of sewer biofilms. The degradation followed first order kinetics with significantly higher rate in rising main condition than in gravity sewer condition. Additionally, daily loads of creatinine were determined in wastewater samples collected on Census day from 10 wastewater treatment plants around Australia. The measured loads of creatinine from those samples were much lower than expected and did not correlate with the populations across the sampled treatment plants. The results suggested that creatinine may not be a suitable biomarker for population normalisation purpose in sewage epidemiology, especially in sewer catchment with high percentage of rising mains.
Keyword Stability
Sewer reactor
Degradation
Sewer biofilms
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 22 Apr 2014, 17:33:08 EST by Dr Phong Thai on behalf of National Res Centre For Environmental Toxicology