Selective attention in the honeybee optic lobes precedes behavioral choices

Paulk, Angelique C., Stacey, Jacqueline A., Pearson, Thomas W. J., Taylor, Gavin J., Moore, Richard J. D., Srinivasan, Mandyam V. and Van Swinderen, Bruno (2014) Selective attention in the honeybee optic lobes precedes behavioral choices. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111 13: 5006-5011. doi:10.1073/pnas.1323297111


Author Paulk, Angelique C.
Stacey, Jacqueline A.
Pearson, Thomas W. J.
Taylor, Gavin J.
Moore, Richard J. D.
Srinivasan, Mandyam V.
Van Swinderen, Bruno
Title Selective attention in the honeybee optic lobes precedes behavioral choices
Journal name Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0027-8424
1091-6490
Publication date 2014-04-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1323297111
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 111
Issue 13
Start page 5006
End page 5011
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington, DC United States
Publisher National Academy of Sciences
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Attention allows animals to respond selectively to competing stimuli, enabling some stimuli to evoke a behavioral response while others are ignored. How the brain does this remains mysterious, although it is increasingly evident that even animals with the smallest brains display this capacity. For example, insects respond selectively to salient visual stimuli, but it is unknown where such selectivity occurs in the insect brain, or whether neural correlates of attention might predict the visual choices made by an insect. Here, we investigate neural correlates of visual attention in behaving honeybees (Apis mellifera). Using a closed-loop paradigm that allows tethered, walking bees to actively control visual objects in a virtual reality arena, we show that behavioral fixation increases neuronal responses to flickering, frequency-tagged stimuli. Attention-like effects were reduced in the optic lobes during replay of the same visual sequences, when bees were not able to control the visual displays. When bees were presented with competing frequency-tagged visual stimuli, selectivity in the medulla (an optic ganglion) preceded behavioral selection of a stimulus, suggesting that modulation of early visual processing centers precedes eventual behavioral choices made by these insects.
Keyword Electrophysiology
Invertebrate
Local field potential
Vision
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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