Intracellular distribution of the vitamin D receptor in the brain: Comparison with classic target tissues and redistribution with development

Eyles, D. W., Liu, P. Y., Josh, P. and Cui, X. (2014) Intracellular distribution of the vitamin D receptor in the brain: Comparison with classic target tissues and redistribution with development. Neuroscience, 268 1-9. doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2014.02.042


Author Eyles, D. W.
Liu, P. Y.
Josh, P.
Cui, X.
Title Intracellular distribution of the vitamin D receptor in the brain: Comparison with classic target tissues and redistribution with development
Journal name Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-7544
0306-4522
Publication date 2014-05-30
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2014.02.042
Volume 268
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Apart from its role in regulating calcium there is growing evidence that vitamin D is a neuroactive steroid capable of regulating multiple pathways important for both brain development and mature brain function. Vitamin D induces its genomic effects through its nuclear receptor the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Although there is abundant evidence for this receptor's presence in the mammalian brain from studies employing immunohistochemistry, Western blot or quantitative RNA studies there remains some dispute regarding the validity of these studies. In this study we provide unambiguous confirmation for the VDR in adult rodent brain using proteomic techniques. However Western blot experiments show that compared to more classic target organs such as the gut and kidney, VDR expression is quantitatively lower in the brain. In addition we have examined VDR subcellular distribution in the gut, kidney and brain from both embryonic and adult tissues. We show that in all embryonic tissues VDR distribution is mostly nuclear, however by adulthood it appears that at least in the gut and kidney, VDR presence in the plasma membrane is more prominent perhaps reflecting some change in VDR function with the maturation of these tissues. Finally the subcellular distribution of VDR in the embryo did not appear to be altered by vitamin D deficiency indicating that perhaps there are other mechanisms at play in vivo to stabilize this receptor in the absence of its ligand.
Keyword Development
Membrane vitamin D receptor
Nuclear vitamin D receptor
Rat
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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