New graduate occupational therapists' perceptions of near-misses and mistakes in the workplace

Clark, Michele, Gray, Marion and Mooney, Jane (2013) New graduate occupational therapists' perceptions of near-misses and mistakes in the workplace. International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, 26 6: 564-576. doi:10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2011-0061


Author Clark, Michele
Gray, Marion
Mooney, Jane
Title New graduate occupational therapists' perceptions of near-misses and mistakes in the workplace
Journal name International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0952-6862
1758-6542
Publication date 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2011-0061
Open Access Status
Volume 26
Issue 6
Start page 564
End page 576
Total pages 11
Place of publication Bingley, W Yorks, United Kingdom
Publisher Emerald Group
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of near-misses and mistakes among new graduate occupational therapists from Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand (NZ), and their knowledge of current incident reporting systems.

Design/methodology/approach: New graduate occupational therapists in Australia and Aotearoa/NZ in their first year of practice (n=228) participated in an online electronic survey that examined five areas of work preparedness. Near-misses and mistakes was one focus area.

Findings: The occurrence and disclosure of practice errors among new graduate occupational therapists are similar between Australian and Aotearoa/NZ participants. Rural location, structured supervision and registration status significantly influenced the perceptions and reporting of practice errors. Structured supervision significantly impacted on reporting procedure knowledge. Current registration status was strongly correlated with perceptions that the workplace encouraged event reporting.

Research limitations/ implications: Areas for further investigation include investigating the perceptions and knowledge of practice errors within a broader profession and the need to explore definitional aspects and contextual factors of adverse events that occur in allied health settings. Selection bias may be a factor in this study. Practical implications: Findings have implications for university and workplace structures, such as clinical management, supervision, training about practice errors and reporting mechanisms in allied health.

Originality/value: Findings may enable the development of better strategies for detecting, managing and preventing practice errors in the allied health professions.
Keyword Allied health
Australia
Human error
Incidence reporting
Mistakes
Near-miss
New Zealand
Occupational therapists
Training
Working practices
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 14 Apr 2014, 15:47:51 EST by Anthony Yeates on behalf of Aust Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology