Contrary effects of leaf position and identity on oviposition and larval feeding patterns of the diamondback moth

Ang, Gurion C. K., Silva, Rehan, Maxwell, Sean L., Zalucki, Myron P. and Furlong, Michael J. (2014) Contrary effects of leaf position and identity on oviposition and larval feeding patterns of the diamondback moth. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 151 1: 86-96. doi:10.1111/eea.12172


Author Ang, Gurion C. K.
Silva, Rehan
Maxwell, Sean L.
Zalucki, Myron P.
Furlong, Michael J.
Title Contrary effects of leaf position and identity on oviposition and larval feeding patterns of the diamondback moth
Journal name Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0013-8703
1570-7458
Publication date 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/eea.12172
Open Access Status
Volume 151
Issue 1
Start page 86
End page 96
Total pages 11
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The influence of leaf position and leaf identity on oviposition and neonate feeding site establishment by the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), were investigated in laboratory experiments. Leaves were excised from cabbage [Brassica oleracea L. capitata, cv. Sugarloaf (Brassicaceae)] and the plants reconfigured on artificial stems made from oasis floral foam. Excised leaves were arranged in their normal (natural) order, in reverse order, or in random order. Relative leaf position, but not leaf identity, significantly influenced the choice of oviposition site; when exposed to female moths, leaves in the lowest three positions always received most eggs. To eliminate the effect of leaf position, oviposition experiments were conducted on excised leaves held at uniform height in individual blocks of oasis foam that had been randomly allocated to a position in a circle at the base of an oviposition cage. Moths laid significantly more eggs on younger leaves, but egg density per unit area did not vary among leaves, supporting the finding that leaf identity did not affect moth oviposition. In experiments that investigated the establishment of neonate feeding sites in reconfigured plants, feeding sites were always concentrated on the youngest two leaves of plants, regardless of their position in normal-, reverse-, and random-order plant configurations. This indicates that leaf identity rather than leaf position determines the site of neonate feeding site establishment. The contrary effects of leaf identity and leaf position on oviposition and neonate feeding site establishment in the same species suggests that different life stages utilize different plant cues (perhaps both physical and chemical) in life stage-specific ways. 
Keyword Bioassay
Brassica oleracea
Lepidoptera
Neonate larvae
Plant architecture
Plutella xylostella
Plutellidae
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 13 Apr 2014, 00:02:24 EST by System User on behalf of Examinations