Cross-mining and media ownership, and the public interest: A case of Mein Kraft?

Cvetkovski, Trajce (2013). Cross-mining and media ownership, and the public interest: A case of Mein Kraft?. In: Australian Political Studies Association Annual Conference 2013 : Peer Reviewed Full Papers. Australian Political Studies Association Annual Conference 2013 (APSA 2013), Perth, Australia, (1-50). 30 September - 2 October 2013.

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Author Cvetkovski, Trajce
Title of paper Cross-mining and media ownership, and the public interest: A case of Mein Kraft?
Formatted title
Cross-mining and media ownership, and the public interest: A case of Mein Kraft?
Conference name Australian Political Studies Association Annual Conference 2013 (APSA 2013)
Conference location Perth, Australia
Conference dates 30 September - 2 October 2013
Proceedings title Australian Political Studies Association Annual Conference 2013 : Peer Reviewed Full Papers
Place of Publication Perth, Australia
Publisher Australian Political Studies Association
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
Start page 1
End page 50
Total pages 50
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
This paper is concerned with convergence patterns in natural resources and popular media industries in Australia. It examines the subsequent effects on public policy in these two influential arenas which already display concentrated ownership. The relationship between mining magnates and media moguls has strengthened in recent years; calling for renewed debate about whether this development is in the best public interest given that only a handful of powerful persons control the bulk of mining and media. If rapid consolidation under a weak regulatory and governance framework is permitted, then effectively, only a few natural and artificial citizens, as übercitizens, will culturally represent the interests of Australians generally concerned about the future of natural resource exploitation.

Interest in concentrated cross-media ownership is not new. Interest in the staggering wealth created by mining booms is not new either. However what remains underdeveloped in the literature is a consideration of the current synergies between the two industries. This paper examines these recent developments. Given the overwhelming dominant status quo in both arenas, the potential for elites to influence public debate and therefore shape attitudes and beliefs about the impact of natural resource development is worthy of greater critical political and economic analysis.Mining-media convergence in a weak regulatory environment essentially becomes a “game about placing blocks to build anything you can imagine” (a bit like the computer game Minecraft - but only real).
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 09 Apr 2014, 17:52:40 EST by Bronwyn Clare Crook on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies