Facilitating access to the algal economy: mapping waste resources to identify suitable locations for algal farms in Queensland

Prasad, Penny, Pullar, David and Pratt, Steven (2014) Facilitating access to the algal economy: mapping waste resources to identify suitable locations for algal farms in Queensland. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 86 47-52. doi:10.1016/j.resconrec.2014.01.008


Author Prasad, Penny
Pullar, David
Pratt, Steven
Title Facilitating access to the algal economy: mapping waste resources to identify suitable locations for algal farms in Queensland
Journal name Resources, Conservation and Recycling   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-0658
0921-3449
Publication date 2014-05
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.resconrec.2014.01.008
Open Access Status
Volume 86
Start page 47
End page 52
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Algae offer a multiple-benefit opportunity as the products that can result from algal cultivation are numerous and diverse. However, commercial production of algal-derived materials is scarce and in Queensland Australia is virtually non-existent, partly due to challenges around readily available resources. In this work, the potential to regionally recycle waste nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and CO2 to support algal production is considered. A feature of the work is mapping the availability of the three resources for algal cultivation (N, P and CO2) together with climatic and land use considerations. Mapping resolution is defined by the boundaries of Queensland's (Australia) regional authorities. Layering the maps enables identification of regional hotspots for growing algae. Waste resources are shown to be most abundant in Mackay, Burdekin, Toowoomba, Cassowary and Bundaberg; regions which also have favourable eco-climatic conditions. Waste nitrogen is the limiting waste stream, in these and most other regions however additional requirements can be fixed atmospherically, whereas waste CO2 is shown to be abundant relative to waste nutrients. It is found that, based on the availability of waste phosphorus, the top 5 most suitable regions have sufficient resources to produce around 1.1 million t/y of algal biomass. This could potentially produce 309 ML of biodiesel which is 5% of Queensland's 2011 diesel oil sales. The outcomes of this work highlight new opportunities for industrial ecology in non-urban regions.
Keyword Algae
Carbon dioxide
Industrial ecology
Mapping
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 08 Apr 2014, 01:26:51 EST by System User on behalf of School of Chemical Engineering