Multidisciplinary clinic care improves adherence to best practice in head and neck cancer

Kelly, Stephen L., Jackson, James E., Hickey, Brigid E., Szallasi, Frank G. and Bond, Craig A. (2013). Multidisciplinary clinic care improves adherence to best practice in head and neck cancer. In: Australian and New Zealand Head and Neck Society 11th Annual Scientific Meeting. Australian and New Zealand Head and Neck Society 11th Annual Scientific Meeting, Fremantle, WA, Australia, (57-60). August 2009. doi:10.1016/j.amjoto.2012.08.010

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Author Kelly, Stephen L.
Jackson, James E.
Hickey, Brigid E.
Szallasi, Frank G.
Bond, Craig A.
Title of paper Multidisciplinary clinic care improves adherence to best practice in head and neck cancer
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Head and Neck Society 11th Annual Scientific Meeting
Conference location Fremantle, WA, Australia
Conference dates August 2009
Proceedings title Australian and New Zealand Head and Neck Society 11th Annual Scientific Meeting   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name American Journal of Otolaryngology: head and neck medicine and surgery   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher W.B. Saunders
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1016/j.amjoto.2012.08.010
Open Access Status
ISSN 0196-0709
1532-818X
Volume 34
Issue 1
Start page 57
End page 60
Total pages 4
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Purpose
Multidisciplinary team (MDT) care is widely accepted as best practice for patients with head and neck cancer, although there is little evidence that MDT care improves head and neck cancer related outcomes. This study aims to determine the impact of MDT care on measurable clinical quality indicators (CQIs) associated with improved patient outcomes.

Materials and methods
Patients treated for head and neck cancer at Ipswich Hospital from 2001 to 2008 were identified. Comparisons were made in adherence to CQIs between patients treated before (pre MDT) and after (post MDT) the introduction of the MDT. Associations were tested using the Chi-square and Whitney U-test.

Results
Treatment post MDT was associated with greater adherence to CQIs than pre MDT. Post MDT had higher rates of: dental assessment (59% versus 22%, p < .0001), nutritional assessment (57% versus 39%, p = .015), PET staging (41% versus 2%, p < .0001), chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced disease (66% versus 16%, p < .0001) and use of adjuvant CRT for high risk disease (49% versus 16%, p < .0001). The interval between surgery and radiotherapy was shorter in the post MDT group (p = .009) as was the mean length of hospitalization (p = .002).

Conclusions
This study highlights the measurable advantages of MDT care over the standard, less formalized, referral process.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 04 Apr 2014, 09:46:41 EST by Brigid Hickey on behalf of Medicine - Mater Hospital