Do satisfied tourists really intend to come back? Three concerns with empirical studies of the link between satisfaction and behavioral intention

Dolnicar, Sara, Coltman, Tim and Sharma, Rajeev (2015) Do satisfied tourists really intend to come back? Three concerns with empirical studies of the link between satisfaction and behavioral intention. Journal of Travel Research, 54 2: 152-178. doi:10.1177/0047287513513167

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Dolnicar, Sara
Coltman, Tim
Sharma, Rajeev
Title Do satisfied tourists really intend to come back? Three concerns with empirical studies of the link between satisfaction and behavioral intention
Journal name Journal of Travel Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0047-2875
1552-6763
Publication date 2015
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0047287513513167
Volume 54
Issue 2
Start page 152
End page 178
Total pages 27
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract Explaining human behavior is a primary concern for tourism research and a substantial body of research concludes that highly satisfied tourists are more likely to return to a particular destination. In this article, we provide an analysis of this body of work, arriving at three concerns relating to the strength of association between satisfaction and behavioral intention: (1) the link between constructs is complex, resulting in the frequent omission of causal factors; (2) inconsistency with construct operationalization impedes cumulative knowledge development; and (3) explainable variance is impeded by between-study heterogeneity. We illustrate these problems by analyzing empirical guest survey data and conducting a meta-analysis of published papers in the three top tourism journals between 2002 and 2011. We offer four recommendations for future research investigating the link between satisfaction and behavioral intention.
Keyword Satisfaction
Behavioral intentions
Causality
Operationalization
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 10 December 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 31 Mar 2014, 10:53:26 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School