Does best practice clinical supervision lead to better outcomes? Findings from a Queensland study of community allied health professionals

Saxby, Christine, Wilson, Jill and Newcombe, Peter (2013). Does best practice clinical supervision lead to better outcomes? Findings from a Queensland study of community allied health professionals. In: Advances in Clinical Supervision: Innovation and Practice. Conference Monograph: A selection of papers presented at the Advances in Clinical Supervision Conference. Advances in Clinical Supervision: Innovation & Practice. International Clinical Supervision Conference, Sydney, NSW, Australia, (23-27). 4-6 June, 2013.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Saxby, Christine
Wilson, Jill
Newcombe, Peter
Title of paper Does best practice clinical supervision lead to better outcomes? Findings from a Queensland study of community allied health professionals
Conference name Advances in Clinical Supervision: Innovation & Practice. International Clinical Supervision Conference
Conference location Sydney, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 4-6 June, 2013
Proceedings title Advances in Clinical Supervision: Innovation and Practice. Conference Monograph: A selection of papers presented at the Advances in Clinical Supervision Conference
Series Advances in Clinical Supervision Monograph
Place of Publication Paramatta, NSW, Australia
Publisher The New South Wales Institute of Psychiatry
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780002382209
Start page 23
End page 27
Total pages 5
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Clinical supervision is widely recognised as a key strategy for providing professional support and clinical governance
for health workers. While there has been much written about how to provide clinical supervision, there has been limited
empirical evidence about its outcomes, and about what makes clinical supervision more or less effective. This is especially
so in relation to allied health populations. This study sought to identify whether clinical supervision was perceived to be
effective by allied health supervisees and to identify components that contributed to effectiveness. The study covered a
range of allied health professions across a metropolitan health district. The research is part of a wider two phase study
to identify the relationship between effectiveness of clinical supervision and levels of burnout and intent to leave in
community allied health professionals. This paper presents selected findings from Phase One of the study. The results
suggest that appropriate infrastructure is important for the delivery of effective clinical supervision. It concludes with a
discussion of the implications of these findings given the competition for resources within the health sector. The study’s
findings make an important contribution to the developing evidence base for clinical supervision practice for allied health
professionals.
Keyword Clinical supervision
Allied health
Professional support
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sat, 29 Mar 2014, 14:17:38 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Social Work and Human Services