Effects of individualistic and collectivistic orientations on social loafing in sport

Glynn, Tony (2001). Effects of individualistic and collectivistic orientations on social loafing in sport Master's Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Glynn, Tony
Thesis Title Effects of individualistic and collectivistic orientations on social loafing in sport
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2001
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Supervisor Stephanie Hanrahan
Total pages 51
Language eng
Subjects L
321404 Sport and Exercise Psychology
Formatted abstract

The purpose of the investigation was to examine if social loafing could be eliminated by inducing rowers to adopt a collectivistic orientation in a team situation. Rowers were identified as extreme individualists or moderate individualists based on their Shortened Individualism-Collectivism Scale scores. They completed three six-minute ergometer rows in a counterbalanced order alone, among simulated rowing aggregates (rowers selected randomly from clubs or colleges), and as part of simulated in-groups (rowers from the same college or club). Rowers participating alone, or as part of an in-group, performed significantly better than they did in an aggregate. A significant rise in collectivism (as measured by the Individualism-Collectivism Interpersonal Assessment Inventory) was also evident when rowers performed in an in-group, compared to when they performed in an aggregate. No significant effects were found between extreme individualists and moderate individualists. Therefore, manipulating the context of the situation when performing in a team was sufficient to induce rowers to adopt a collectivistic orientation and to eliminate social loafing.

Keyword Rowing

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Fri, 28 Mar 2014, 14:15:57 EST by Nicole Rayner on behalf of The University of Queensland Library