Validity of real-time measures of stuttering frequency

O'Brian, Sue, Jones, Mark, Lincoln, Michelle, Harrison, Elisabeth, Packman, Ann, Menzies, Ross and Onslow, Mark (2013) Validity of real-time measures of stuttering frequency. Speech, Language and Hearing, 16 2: 107-116. doi:10.1179/2050571X13Z.00000000015


Author O'Brian, Sue
Jones, Mark
Lincoln, Michelle
Harrison, Elisabeth
Packman, Ann
Menzies, Ross
Onslow, Mark
Title Validity of real-time measures of stuttering frequency
Journal name Speech, Language and Hearing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2050-571X
2050-5728
Publication date 2013-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1179/2050571X13Z.00000000015
Open Access Status
Volume 16
Issue 2
Start page 107
End page 116
Total pages 10
Place of publication Leeds, W Yorks, United Kingdom
Publisher Maney Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose This study investigated the validity of real-time measurement of percent syllables stuttered (%SS), and whether slowing down the rate of presentation of recorded speech samples, or independent measurement of the number of stutters and the number of syllables improved this validity.

Method Eight speech–language pathologists (SLPs) measured %SS from 16 × 3-minute audio samples of stuttered speech, presented in the following ways: (1) concurrently counting stutters and syllables at original speed, (2) concurrently counting stutters and syllables with the speed of presentation slowed by about a third, (3) independently counting stutters and syllables at original speed, or (4) independently counting stutters and syllables at reduced speed. All measures were compared with previously determined ‘expert consensus’ values. SLPs also rated each method for ease of use.

Results Results showed no significant difference between the expert consensus measures and any of the measurement methods in terms of validity or reliability, despite SLPs generally finding the modified methods easier to use.

Conclusions Neither slowing down the rate of presentation nor counting stutters and syllables independently improved the validity or reliability of real-time measurement of %SS by SLPs.
Keyword Stuttering
Measurement
Percent syllables stuttered
Validity
Reliability
Slowed rate
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 28 Mar 2014, 11:05:45 EST by Nyree Divitini on behalf of Health LinQ