Sex-specific patterns of morphological diversification: evolution of reaction norms and static allometries in neriid flies

Cassidy, Elizabeth J., Bath, Eleanor, Chenoweth, Stephen F. and Bonduriansky, Russell (2014) Sex-specific patterns of morphological diversification: evolution of reaction norms and static allometries in neriid flies. Evolution, 68 2: 368-383. doi:10.1111/evo.12276


Author Cassidy, Elizabeth J.
Bath, Eleanor
Chenoweth, Stephen F.
Bonduriansky, Russell
Title Sex-specific patterns of morphological diversification: evolution of reaction norms and static allometries in neriid flies
Journal name Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-3820
1558-5646
Publication date 2014-02
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/evo.12276
Open Access Status
Volume 68
Issue 2
Start page 368
End page 383
Total pages 16
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The consequences of sex-specific selection for patterns of diversification remain poorly known. Because male secondary sexual traits are typically costly to express, and both costs and benefits are likely to depend on ambient environment and individual condition, such traits may be expected to diversify via changes in reaction norms as well as the scaling of trait size with body size (static allometry). We investigated morphological diversification within two species of Australian neriid flies (Telostylinus angusticollis, Telostylinus lineolatus) by rearing larvae from several populations on larval diets varying sixfold in nutrient concentration. Mean body size varied among populations of T. angusticollis, but body size reaction norms did not vary within either species. However, we detected diversification of reaction norms for body shape in males and females within both species. Moreover, unlike females, males also diversified in static allometry slope and reaction norms for static allometry slope of sexual and nonsexual traits. Our findings reveal qualitative sex differences in patterns of morphological diversification, whereby shape–size relationships diversify extensively in males, but remain conserved in females despite extensive evolution of trait means. Our results highlight the importance of incorporating plasticity and allometry in studies of adaptation and diversification.
Keyword Adaptation
Allometry
Diet
Diversification
Evolution
Plasticity
Reaction norms
Secondary sexual traits
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 16 OCT 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 27 Mar 2014, 13:17:30 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences