'[Carter] screwed me': restoring perceptions of Democratic Party foreign policy strength in the post-Carter era

Bedggood, Samantha (2013). '[Carter] screwed me': restoring perceptions of Democratic Party foreign policy strength in the post-Carter era. In: Mobilities and Mobilisations in History: 40th Anniversary of the AHA. 32nd Annual Conference Handbook. AHA 2013: The Australian Historical Association 32nd Annual Conference. Mobilities and Mobilisations in History, Woolongong, NSW, Australia, (6-7). 8-12 July, 2013.

Author Bedggood, Samantha
Title of paper '[Carter] screwed me': restoring perceptions of Democratic Party foreign policy strength in the post-Carter era
Conference name AHA 2013: The Australian Historical Association 32nd Annual Conference. Mobilities and Mobilisations in History
Conference location Woolongong, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 8-12 July, 2013
Proceedings title Mobilities and Mobilisations in History: 40th Anniversary of the AHA. 32nd Annual Conference Handbook
Place of Publication Woolongong, NSW, Australia
Publisher Australian History Association
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Published abstract
Open Access Status
Start page 6
End page 7
Total pages 2
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
When he left office in 1981, Carter was viewed as the personification of the weak foreign policy president; one lacking clarity, vision and resolve, and one who, in the words of former President Richard Nixon, had â€oeled America to the nadir of its strength and resolve. While this characterisation was increasingly interrogated in subsequent decades, this popular perception of Carter remained pervasive. During the 1992 presidential campaign, the tendency to draw parallels between Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter was perhaps inevitable, insofar as both were reformed southern Democratic Governors. However, for Clinton campaign strategists, the Carter administration was seen to be a case study in foreign policy incompetence and bureaucratic dysfunction whose legacy threatened their ability to position Clinton as a strong and capable Commander-In-Chief. This paper will explore the various means (both rhetorical and substantive) by which that Clinton sought to distance himself from both Carter and the Vietnam experience, in order to restore the credibility of the Democratic Party in the realm of national security.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Wed, 26 Mar 2014, 11:06:19 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry