Cholinergic modulation of respiratory brain-stem neurons and its function in sleep-wake state determination

Bellingham, Mark C. and Funk, Greg D. (2000). Cholinergic modulation of respiratory brain-stem neurons and its function in sleep-wake state determination. In: Australian Neuroscience Society Symposium: Nervous Control of Breathing. Australian Neuroscience Society Symposium on Nervous Control of Breathing, Hobart, Australia, (132-137). January/February 1999. doi:10.1046/j.1440-1681.2000.03192.x


Author Bellingham, Mark C.
Funk, Greg D.
Title of paper Cholinergic modulation of respiratory brain-stem neurons and its function in sleep-wake state determination
Conference name Australian Neuroscience Society Symposium on Nervous Control of Breathing
Conference location Hobart, Australia
Conference dates January/February 1999
Proceedings title Australian Neuroscience Society Symposium: Nervous Control of Breathing   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Publication Year 2000
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1046/j.1440-1681.2000.03192.x
Open Access Status
ISSN 1440-1681
0305-1870
Volume 27
Issue 1-2
Start page 132
End page 137
Total pages 6
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
SUMMARY

1. Shifts in behavioural state are controlled by reciprocal changes in discharge of cholinergic and aminergic groups of brain-stem/pontine neurons. During rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, cholinergic neurons are most active and aminergic neurons are least active.

2. Significant changes occur in the central control of breathing during REM sleep; respiration rate increases in frequency and variability, brain-stem respiratory neuron discharge is generally enhanced and the outputs of some respiratory motor neuron pools are depressed.

3. Hypoglossal motor neurons (HM) control tongue movement and their depression during REM sleep has been implicated in obstructive sleep apnoea. The cellular basis of HM depression has been investigated in vitro and may be due to enhanced activation of cholinergic receptors or decreased activation of aminergic receptors.

4. In vitro preparations that show respiratory rhythmogenesis possess advantages for the investigation of the neurochemical basis of state-dependent changes in respiration. Cholinergic changes in respiratory modulation of HM recorded in rhythmic brain-stem slices from mice depend on the site of activation of cholinergic receptors.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 26 Mar 2014, 10:37:15 EST by Dr Mark Bellingham on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences