Review of current evidence and future directions in animal-assisted intervention for children with autism

O'Haire, M. E. (2013) Review of current evidence and future directions in animal-assisted intervention for children with autism. OA Autism, 1 1: 6.1-6.5. doi:10.13172/2052-7810-5-1-445

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Author O'Haire, M. E.
Title Review of current evidence and future directions in animal-assisted intervention for children with autism
Journal name OA Autism   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2052-7810
Publication date 2013-03-10
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.13172/2052-7810-5-1-445
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 1
Issue 1
Start page 6.1
End page 6.5
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, UK
Publisher OA Publishing London
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction Autism has been highlighted as a pressing public health issue that may be ameliorated through the inclusion of animals in autism treatment services, also known as animal-assisted intervention. Over the past 20 years, only a few studies have empirically examined the impact of therapeutic interactions with animals for individuals with autism. A review of the existing literature indicates that incorporating animals into autism treatment practices may provide a motivating stimulus for individuals with autism to enhance social functioning. However, more rigorous investigation is critical before widespread implementation can be adopted. In this review, I explore the current literature on animal-assisted intervention for autism, synthesise relevant findings for clinical practice and present targeted directions for future research.

Conclusion Research suggests positive social functioning outcomes for some children with autism following human-animal interaction. The use of animal-assisted intervention and service animals appear to provide a valuable addition to current autism treatment practices and therefore are worthy of further investigation.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 25 Mar 2014, 13:26:17 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology