Adaptation to changing institutional, market and bio-physical environments: the case of China's grasslands

Brown, Colin G., Waldron, Scott A. and Longworth, John W. (2013). Adaptation to changing institutional, market and bio-physical environments: the case of China's grasslands. In: David L. Michalk, Geoffrey D. Millar, Warwick B. Badgery and Kim M. Broadfoot, Proceedings 22nd International Grassland Congress: Revitalising Grasslands to Sustain Our Communities. IGC2013: 22nd International Grassland Congress, Darling Harbour, NSW, Australia, (1819-1825). 15-19 September, 2013.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Brown, Colin G.
Waldron, Scott A.
Longworth, John W.
Title of paper Adaptation to changing institutional, market and bio-physical environments: the case of China's grasslands
Conference name IGC2013: 22nd International Grassland Congress
Conference location Darling Harbour, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 15-19 September, 2013
Proceedings title Proceedings 22nd International Grassland Congress: Revitalising Grasslands to Sustain Our Communities
Place of Publication Sydney, NSW, Australia
Publisher NSW Department of Primary Industries
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9781742565439
9781742565422
Editor David L. Michalk
Geoffrey D. Millar
Warwick B. Badgery
Kim M. Broadfoot
Volume 22
Start page 1819
End page 1825
Total pages 7
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
In the modern world, small pastoral herder households living on grasslands in countries such as China face major challenges in adapting to changes in their institutional, market and bio-physical environments. In China, these changes have been profound over the last 30 years. Herders, their communities and others dependent on the grasslands have responded to these developments but not always as might be expected. In this paper, the sources of the macro-forces in China that have created the pressure for change at the grass roots are outlined and the micro-adjustments made by herders and others in response to these pressures are analysed. A longitudinal multidisciplinary perspective is employed to distil insights from studying the dynamics of these adjustments over the last three decades. The major finding is that macro reforms can create enormous pressure for micro adaptive initiatives by herders and others dependent on the grasslands. Most importantly, the responses of these actors are not always as predicted and may pose major threats to the future sustainability of pastoralism based on the grasslands.
Keyword China
Grasslands
Pastoralism
Institutions
Markets
Adaptation
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Created: Fri, 21 Mar 2014, 11:18:37 EST by Dr Colin Brown on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences