Processionary Caterpillar Setae and Equine Fetal Loss: 1. Histopathology of Experimentally Exposed Pregnant Mares

Todhunter, K. H., Cawdell-Smith, A. J., Bryden, W. L., Perkins, N. R. and Begg, A. P. (2014) Processionary Caterpillar Setae and Equine Fetal Loss: 1. Histopathology of Experimentally Exposed Pregnant Mares. Veterinary Pathology, 51 6: 1117-1130. doi:10.1177/0300985813516638


Author Todhunter, K. H.
Cawdell-Smith, A. J.
Bryden, W. L.
Perkins, N. R.
Begg, A. P.
Title Processionary Caterpillar Setae and Equine Fetal Loss: 1. Histopathology of Experimentally Exposed Pregnant Mares
Journal name Veterinary Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0300-9858
1544-2217
Publication date 2014-12-30
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0300985813516638
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 51
Issue 6
Start page 1117
End page 1130
Total pages 15
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA United States
Publisher Sage Publications, Inc.
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
 Six pregnant Standardbred mares aged between 6 and 14 years were gavaged with 50 g or 100 g of suspended emulsified whole.  Processionary caterpillars (Ochrogaster lunifer) for 5 days during 2 experiments undertaken to study the etiology of equine amnionitis and fetal loss (EAFL). The 6 treated mares and 1 untreated mare were between 128 and 252 days gestation. Mare 1 (untreated) was euthanized on day 5 of the treatment period, while the treated mares were euthanized on days 2, 4, 8, 10, 12, and 24 days from their first treatment. Caterpillar setae were not found in the untreated mare. Setal fragments were present in all regions of the gastrointestinal tracts in all treated mares, the uteri and mesenteric lymph nodes of 5 mares, and the liver of 4 mares. Acute gastroenteritis of varying severity was present in all treated mares, and 5 of 6 mares had acute colitis and endometritis. Focal hyperplastic serositis was found in the duodenum, cecum, dorsal colon, and uteri of various mares occasionally with embedded setal fragments. Setal invasion of the mucosa evoked a range of lesions including superficial erosion to deep ulceration. Inflammation in deeper tissues ranged from unapparent to neutrophilic (microabscesses), eosinophilic, or mononuclear (microgranulomas). The finding of setal fragments within the uterus of experimental mares suggests that direct migration of setal fragments acting as a bacterial vector is a likely mechanism for the bacterial abortions that characterize equine amnionitis and fetal loss.
Keyword Abortion
Caterpillars
Equine
Fetal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Created: Thu, 20 Mar 2014, 16:04:03 EST by Dr Judy Cawdell-smith on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation