Risk factors associated with injury and mortality from paediatric low speed vehicle incidents: a systematic review

Anthikkat, Anne Paul, Page, Andrew and Barker, Ruth (2013) Risk factors associated with injury and mortality from paediatric low speed vehicle incidents: a systematic review. International Journal of Pediatrics, 2013 841360.1-841360.17. doi:10.1155/2013/841360

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Author Anthikkat, Anne Paul
Page, Andrew
Barker, Ruth
Title Risk factors associated with injury and mortality from paediatric low speed vehicle incidents: a systematic review
Journal name International Journal of Pediatrics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1687-9740
1687-9759
Publication date 2013-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1155/2013/841360
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2013
Start page 841360.1
End page 841360.17
Total pages 17
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: This study reviews modifiable risk factors associated with fatal and nonfatal injury from low-speed vehicle runover
(LSVRO) incidents involving children aged 0–15 years.

Data Sources: Electronic searches for child pedestrian and driveway injuries from the peer-reviewed literature and transport-related websites from 1955 to 2012. Study Selection. 41 studies met the study inclusion criteria.

Data Extraction: A systematic narrative summary was conducted that included study design, methodology, risk
factors, and other study variables.

Results: The most commonly reported risk factors for LSVRO incidents included age under 5 years, male gender, and reversing vehicles. The majority of reported incidents involved residential driveways, but several studies identified other traffic and nontraffic locations. Low socioeconomic status and rental accommodation were also associated with LSVRO injury. Vehicles were most commonly driven by a family member, predominantly a parent.

Conclusion: There are a number of modifiable vehicular, environmental, and behavioural factors associated with LSVRO injuries in young children that have been identified in the literature to date. Strategies relating to vehicle design (devices for increased rearward visibility and crash avoidance systems), housing design (physical separation of driveway and play areas), and behaviour (driver behaviour, supervision of young children) are discussed.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 18 Mar 2014, 23:57:30 EST by Anthony Yeates on behalf of School of Public Health