More human than human: does the uncanny curve really matter?

Złotowski, Jakub, Proudfoot, Diane and Bartneck, Christoph (2013). More human than human: does the uncanny curve really matter?. In: Humanlikeness2013: Workshop Proceedings. HRI2013 Workshop on Design of Humanlikeness in HRI: from uncanny valley to minimal design. HRI2013 Workshop on Design of Humanlikeness in HRI from uncanny valley to minimal design (in conjunction with 8th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI2013), Tokyo, Japan, (7-13). 3 March, 2013.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Złotowski, Jakub
Proudfoot, Diane
Bartneck, Christoph
Title of paper More human than human: does the uncanny curve really matter?
Conference name HRI2013 Workshop on Design of Humanlikeness in HRI from uncanny valley to minimal design (in conjunction with 8th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI2013)
Conference location Tokyo, Japan
Conference dates 3 March, 2013
Proceedings title Humanlikeness2013: Workshop Proceedings. HRI2013 Workshop on Design of Humanlikeness in HRI: from uncanny valley to minimal design
Place of Publication Toyonaka, Osaka, Japan
Publisher Hiroshi Ishiguro Laboratories
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
Start page 7
End page 13
Total pages 7
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Anthropomorphism is a common phenomenon known already in ancient times. It is not a thing of the past, but still has a profound impact on major aspects of our lives and on research in AI and HRI. Its importance in the field of HRI is emphasized by the hotly-discussed uncanny valley hypothesis. However, in spite of its popularity, the uncanny valley hypothesis lacks empirical evidence. In this paper we suggest that the community should stop trying to fit data to this hypothesis, but rather, based on the available evidence, start talking about the ‘uncanny curve’. Moreover, we point out mistakes in the previous studies of the uncanny curve and strongly encourage exploring it in a real HRI for it to be really relevant. We suggest that understanding the opposite process of anthropomorphisation, known as dehumanization, can help to cross the uncanny bottom of the graph.
Keyword Human-robot interaction
Uncanny valley
Uncanny curve
Anthropomorphism
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Non HERDC
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Created: Tue, 18 Mar 2014, 10:23:02 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry