Don't Grin When You Win: The Social Costs of Positive Emotion Expression in Performance Situations

Kalokerinos, Elise K., Greenaway, Katharine H., Pedder, David J. and Margetts, Elise A. (2013) Don't Grin When You Win: The Social Costs of Positive Emotion Expression in Performance Situations. Emotion, 14 1: 180-186. doi:10.1037/a0034442


Author Kalokerinos, Elise K.
Greenaway, Katharine H.
Pedder, David J.
Margetts, Elise A.
Title Don't Grin When You Win: The Social Costs of Positive Emotion Expression in Performance Situations
Journal name Emotion   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1528-3542
1931-1516
Publication date 2013-11-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0034442
Open Access Status
Volume 14
Issue 1
Start page 180
End page 186
Total pages 7
Place of publication Washington, DC United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 3200 Psychology
Abstract People who express positive emotion usually have better social outcomes than people who do not, and suppressing the expression of emotions can have interpersonal costs. Nevertheless, social convention suggests that there are situations in which people should suppress the expression of positive emotions, such as when trying to appear humble in victory. The present research tested whether there are interpersonal costs to expressing positive emotions when winning. In Experiment 1, inexpressive winners were evaluated more positively and rated as lower in hubristic-but not authentic-pride compared with expressive winners. Experiment 2 confirmed that inexpressive winners were perceived as using expressive suppression to downregulate their positive emotion expression. Experiment 3 replicated the findings of Experiment 1, and also found that people were more interested in forming a friendship with inexpressive winners than expressive winners. The effects were mediated by the perception that the inexpressive winner tried to protect the loser's feelings. This research is the first to identify social costs of expressing positive emotion, and highlights the importance of understanding the situational context when determining optimal emotion regulation strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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