A review of Digitaria didactyla Willd., a low-input warm-season turfgrass in Australia: biology, adaptation and management

Loch, Donald S., McMaugh, Peter and Scattini, Walter J. (2013). A review of Digitaria didactyla Willd., a low-input warm-season turfgrass in Australia: biology, adaptation and management. In: Research Papers presented at the 10th International Turfgrass Research Conference. ITRC 2013: 12th International Turfgrass Research Conference, Beijing, China, (1-14). 14-19 July, 2013.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ325603.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 262.02KB 29
Author Loch, Donald S.
McMaugh, Peter
Scattini, Walter J.
Title of paper A review of Digitaria didactyla Willd., a low-input warm-season turfgrass in Australia: biology, adaptation and management
Formatted title
A review of Digitaria didactyla Willd., a low-input warm-season turfgrass in Australia: biology, adaptation and management
Conference name ITRC 2013: 12th International Turfgrass Research Conference
Conference location Beijing, China
Conference dates 14-19 July, 2013
Proceedings title Research Papers presented at the 10th International Turfgrass Research Conference
Journal name International Turfgrass Society Research Journal
Place of Publication Overland Park, KS, USA
Publisher Intertec Publishing
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISSN 1817-0641
Volume 12
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Digitaria didactyla Willd. (blue couch) is a warm-season turfgrass well adapted to use in low maintenance lawns, parks and golf fairways on well-drained acid infertile light-textured soils in humid subtropical and tropical climates with mild winters and an absence of heavy frosting. In Australia, D. didactyla includes material from two different genetic sources: Queensland blue couch from widely naturalised material accidentally introduced from the Mascarene Islands or Madagascar in the early 19th century; and Swazigrass from deliberate introductions of the former D. swazilandensis (native to mainland southern Africa) in the mid-1960s. Two cultivars, ‘Aussiblue’ and ‘Tropika’, derived from Swazigrass germplasm have been released in the past 20 years. Blue couch is less drought hardy than Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers., but recovers quickly once drought stress is removed. It is tolerant of temporary, though not permanent, waterlogging, but has a low tolerance of salinity. While Queensland blue couch is among the least shade tolerant warm-season turfgrass species, Swazigrass does tolerate moderate levels of shading. Propagation is usually by vegetative means, though limited supplies of Queensland blue couch seed are also available. Blue couch has a low fertility requirement, and can invade and replace C. dactylon under low nutrition on acid infertile soils. It is prone to iron deficiency, especially after heavy rainfall. Blue couch is lower thatching and less prone to scalping than C. dactylon, but is also less tolerant of wear than the latter. Lawn armyworm and sod webworm caterpillars are the main pests, with dollar spot the major disease of concern. Most standard broadleaf herbicides can be safely used with blue couch, and fluazifop has shown promise for selective control of other grasses.
Keyword Australia
Adaptation
Biology
Blue couch
Digitaria didactyla
Digitaria swazilandensis
Management
Queensland blue couch
Swazigrass
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 15 Mar 2014, 14:28:07 EST by Don Loch on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences