Tit-for-tat and all that: reciprocity among East Yorkers

Plickert, Gabriele, Côté, Rochelle and Wellman, Barry (2004). Tit-for-tat and all that: reciprocity among East Yorkers. In: Nataša Kejžar, Anuška Ferligoj, Vladimir Batagelj and Andrej Mrvar, Sunbelt XXIV: International Sunbelt Social Network Conference. Program and Abstracts. INSNA 2004: XXIVth International Sunbelt Social Network Conference, Portoroz, Slovenia, (36-37). 12-16 May 2004.

Author Plickert, Gabriele
Côté, Rochelle
Wellman, Barry
Title of paper Tit-for-tat and all that: reciprocity among East Yorkers
Conference name INSNA 2004: XXIVth International Sunbelt Social Network Conference
Conference location Portoroz, Slovenia
Conference dates 12-16 May 2004
Proceedings title Sunbelt XXIV: International Sunbelt Social Network Conference. Program and Abstracts
Place of Publication Ljubljana, Slovenia
Publisher Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Ljubljana
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Published abstract
Open Access Status
ISBN 9612351562
9789612351564
Editor Nataša Kejžar
Anuška Ferligoj
Vladimir Batagelj
Andrej Mrvar
Start page 36
End page 37
Total pages 2
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Reciprocity has been much talked about, studied in laboratory experiments, and discovered in bounded villages and desert islands. Yet, as far as we know, it has never been sytematically studied through survey research in an unbounded urban population. We use data from the second East York (Toronto) study of a large sample of ties (N=350), building upon our NetLab’s extensive analysis of social support in this district of Toronto. We address the following questions: 1. To what extent do specific exchanges of the same kind of support happen over and above what one would randomly expect? 2. To what extent does generalized reciprocity happen, in which one kind of support is exchanged for another? 3. To what extent do other characteristics of a tie (tie-strength, frequency of contact, role relationship) affect the likelihood of reciprocity. 4. To what extent do the personal resources of Egos and network members affect reciprocity? 5. To what extent does the extent of suppotiveness in an Ego’s network affect reciprocity over and above the characteristics of each Ego-network member’s ties and personal resources? As our data come from 1979, they provide the further advantage of allowing a baseline comparison with how relationships have changed in conjunction with new forms of communication, such as the Internet and cellphones. This is the focus of our new Third East York study of relationships in an era of ”network individualism”.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 14 Mar 2014, 15:44:52 EST by Rochelle Cote on behalf of ISSR - Research Groups