Food pricing, extreme weather and the rural/urban divide: a case study of northern NSW, Australia

Singh-Peterson, Lila, Shoebridge, Amanda and Lawrence, Geoffrey (2013) Food pricing, extreme weather and the rural/urban divide: a case study of northern NSW, Australia. Journal of Food Security, 1 2: 42-48. doi:10.12691/jfs-1-2-5

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Author Singh-Peterson, Lila
Shoebridge, Amanda
Lawrence, Geoffrey
Title Food pricing, extreme weather and the rural/urban divide: a case study of northern NSW, Australia
Journal name Journal of Food Security
ISSN 2372-0115
2372-0107
Publication date 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.12691/jfs-1-2-5
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 1
Issue 2
Start page 42
End page 48
Total pages 7
Place of publication Newark, DE, United States
Publisher Science and Education Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
According to the Australian Government (2012:vi), `a crucial question for the wellbeing of all Australian residents is the extent to which the food supply chain is resilient in the face of disruption’. The impact of extreme weather events and a changing climate on food production influences food prices across time and space. In this study food prices across the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales were surveyed one week after a disastrous flood and cyclone event. Six months later, a follow-up survey was initiated. The surveys provided data which allowed comparisons between food pricing in urban settlements and rural settlements in the region, both at the time of flooding, and six months after the floods. Results from the study indicate that the large chain supermarket prices actually decreased during the six-month period while, in contrast, food pricing in the small independent stores continued to increase after the flood event. We conclude that the smaller, regional stores are less resilient to the impact of the flooding event than are the larger, urban based stores. This raises significant concerns for regional communities that are dependent for food provision from small independent stores.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 13 Mar 2014, 16:04:07 EST by Debbie Lim on behalf of School of Social Science