Threats to belonging on Facebook: lurking and ostracism

Tobin, Stephanie J., Vanman, Eric J., Verreynne, Marnize and Saeri, Alexander K. (2014) Threats to belonging on Facebook: lurking and ostracism. Social Influence, 10 1: 31-42. doi:10.1080/15534510.2014.893924


Author Tobin, Stephanie J.
Vanman, Eric J.
Verreynne, Marnize
Saeri, Alexander K.
Title Threats to belonging on Facebook: lurking and ostracism
Journal name Social Influence   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1553-4510
1553-4529
Publication date 2014-03-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/15534510.2014.893924
Volume 10
Issue 1
Start page 31
End page 42
Total pages 12
Place of publication Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract We examined two threats to belonging and related needs on Facebook: lurking (Study 1) and ostracism (Study 2). In Study 1, participants were either allowed or not allowed to share information on Facebook for 48 hours. Those who were not allowed to share information had lower levels of belonging and meaningful existence. In Study 2, participants engaged in a laboratory-based Facebook activity. Half of the profiles were set up so that participants would not receive any feedback on their status updates. Participants who did not receive feedback on their updates had lower levels of belonging, self-esteem, control, and meaningful existence. Together, these findings indicate that a lack of information sharing and feedback can threaten belonging needs.
Keyword Facebook
Social networking sites
Belonging
Ostracism
Meaning
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 12 Mar 2014, 21:07:09 EST by Dr Stephanie Tobin on behalf of School of Psychology