Magnificent dimensions, varied forms, and brilliant colors: The molecular ecology and evolution of the Indian and Pacific oceans

Crandall, Eric D. and Riginos, Cynthia (2014) Magnificent dimensions, varied forms, and brilliant colors: The molecular ecology and evolution of the Indian and Pacific oceans. Bulletin of Marine Science, 90 1: 1-11. doi:10.5343/bms.2013.1086

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Author Crandall, Eric D.
Riginos, Cynthia
Title Magnificent dimensions, varied forms, and brilliant colors: The molecular ecology and evolution of the Indian and Pacific oceans
Journal name Bulletin of Marine Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-4977
1553-6955
Publication date 2014-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.5343/bms.2013.1086
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 90
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Place of publication Miami, United States
Publisher Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract The tropical Indian and Pacific oceans form the world's largest and most speciose marine biogeographic region: the Indo-Pacific. Due to its size and political complexity, the Indo-Pacific is rarely studied as a whole, yet comprehensive studies of the region promise to teach us much about marine ecology and evolution. Molecular methods can provide substantial initial insights into the processes that create and maintain biodiversity in the region while also providing critical spatial information to managers. This special issue presents six synthetic papers that discuss the current state of molecular work in the Indo-Pacific region as well as best practices for the future. Following these synthetic papers are 15 empirical papers that extend our knowledge of the region considerably. A comprehensive understanding of the biodiversity that we stand to lose in the Indo-Pacific is going to require increased cooperation and collaboration among laboratories that study this region, as exemplified by papers in this special issue.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
Official Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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